Introduction to Computer Music

PY.350.464 | Spring 2017

 

 

DESCRIPTION

 

The second semester of Introduction to Computer Music will build on the materials covered in the first semester. There will be less emphasis on how to use specific pieces of equipment and a greater concentration on bringing together the skills necessary to complete a substantial composition in a computer music environment. Topics to be covered will include the history and literature of Electronic and Computer Music, digital signal processing software, advanced use of Max for composition and performance, and Computer Music concert production. Students will spend the majority of their time working on a Computer Music project of their own choosing.

This course carries three credits

 

 

 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

Upon completion of this course students will be able to:

  1. 1.Have a fundamental knowledge of Computer Music history and literature 

  2. 2.Have a more detailed knowledge of the repertoire they choose to research 

  3. 3.Know how to complete a project in Computer Music 

  4. 4.Have a more thorough grounding in Max/MSP 

  5. 5.Know how to present Computer Music compositions in a performance 

 

 

INSTRUCTOR

Dr. McGregor Boyle      boyle@peabody.jhu.edu

 

Graduate Assistant:  TBD

 

 

COURSE MEETINGS

Introduction to Computer Music will meet Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays from 1:30-2:20 pm in room 314 (Studio Alpha).

 

 

OFFICE HOURS

Office Hours will be immediately before the class from 1:00-1:30

Other times by appointment.

 

 

 

GRADING

Each student’s project will have two components: a research component and a composition component. By February 12 each student will identify an area or an aspect of Electronic and Computer Music in which they have a particular interest. They will submit a written proposal to the instructor explaining the topic they have chosen, and an explanation of how they plan to implement the components of the project. In most cases the project will involve the composition of an original piece, research into other works in the genre, and a performance of the work on the final concert.

There will be a final Computer Music Departmental recital at the end of the semester in May, 2016. It is expected that each person in the class will complete their project in time for performance on this program.  All students in the class are expected to participate in setting up, running, and striking the concert. All students will also be required to attend at least one other concert of computer music and write a review. There will be at least three such concerts at Peabody this semester, as well as several off campus.

Grades will be determined by the class presentation (15%), the composition component of the project (40%), and exams.  There will be two exams, a midterm (20%) and a final (20%). The remaining 5% of the grade will be determined by lab assignments, attendance and class participation. Further details about the class, including a detailed schedule and list of assignments can be found on my website at https://pcm.peabody.jhu.edu/~mboyle/intro.html.

 

 

 

GUIDELINES

Attendance is required for this fast paced course. More than three absences will result in a lowered grade.

 

 

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY

Students enrolled at Peabody are obliged to refrain from acts that threaten the academic integrity of the Conservatory such as cheating or plagiarism.  Violations are reported to Academic Affairs for adjudication and documentation in the student academic record.  Please familiarize yourself with this and all other academic regulations at:

http://www.peabody.jhu.edu/academicaffairs  

 

 

 

DIVERSITY & DISABILITY STATEMENT

The Peabody Institute of the Johns Hopkins University values diversity and inclusion.  We are committed to a climate of mutual respect and civility among members of our community.  Peabody recognizes that disability is an aspect of diversity.  Our goal is to create learning environments that are usable, equitable, inclusive and welcoming.  If there are aspects of the instruction or design of this course that result in barriers to your inclusion or to accurate assessment or achievement related to your disability, please notify the instructor as soon as possible.  Students are also welcome to contact Kyley Sommer, Director of Student Affairs in the Office of Student Affairs, in-person, via email at ksommer@jhu.edu, or by phone at (667) 208-6700  for further information about academic adjustments or accommodations.  

 

 

REQUIRED MATERIALS

There is no single textbook for the course. Readings will be assigned from a variety of sources, including manuals and periodicals. These will be placed on reserve in the music library, made available in the studio,  or handed out in class. On-line references will also be used, with links to them posted on the instructor's web page.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TENTATIVE SCHEDULE

 

 

WEEK

TOPIC/READING/ASSIGNMENT

01

01/16/17

Review

02

01/23/17

Electronic Music history part I

03

02/06/17

Electronic Music history part II

04

02/13/17

Electronic Music history part III

05

02/20/17

Audition Week

06

02/27/17

Computer Music history part I

07

03/06/17

Computer Music history part II

8

03/13/17

Student Presentations

09

03/20/17

Spring Break

10

03/27/17

Intermediate Max/MSP

11

04/03/17

Student progress reports

12

04/10/17

Advanced Max

13

04/17/17

Student progress reports

14

04/24/17

Final project completion

15

05/01/17

Concert Production

 

 

Introduction to Computer Music

PY.350.464 | Spring 2017

 

 

DESCRIPTION

 

The second semester of Introduction to Computer Music will build on the materials covered in the first semester. There will be less emphasis on how to use specific pieces of equipment and a greater concentration on bringing together the skills necessary to complete a substantial composition in a computer music environment. Topics to be covered will include the history and literature of Electronic and Computer Music, digital signal processing software, advanced use of Max for composition and performance, and Computer Music concert production. Students will spend the majority of their time working on a Computer Music project of their own choosing.

This course carries three credits

 

 

 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

Upon completion of this course students will be able to:

  1. 1.Have a fundamental knowledge of Computer Music history and literature 

  2. 2.Have a more detailed knowledge of the repertoire they choose to research 

  3. 3.Know how to complete a project in Computer Music 

  4. 4.Have a more thorough grounding in Max/MSP 

  5. 5.Know how to present Computer Music compositions in a performance 

 

 

INSTRUCTOR

Dr. McGregor Boyle      boyle@peabody.jhu.edu

 

Graduate Assistant:  TBD

 

 

COURSE MEETINGS

Introduction to Computer Music will meet Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays from 1:30-2:20 pm in room 314 (Studio Alpha).

 

 

OFFICE HOURS

Office Hours will be immediately before the class from 1:00-1:30

Other times by appointment.

 

 

 

GRADING

Each student’s project will have two components: a research component and a composition component. By February 12 each student will identify an area or an aspect of Electronic and Computer Music in which they have a particular interest. They will submit a written proposal to the instructor explaining the topic they have chosen, and an explanation of how they plan to implement the components of the project. In most cases the project will involve the composition of an original piece, research into other works in the genre, and a performance of the work on the final concert.

There will be a final Computer Music Departmental recital at the end of the semester in May, 2016. It is expected that each person in the class will complete their project in time for performance on this program.  All students in the class are expected to participate in setting up, running, and striking the concert. All students will also be required to attend at least one other concert of computer music and write a review. There will be at least three such concerts at Peabody this semester, as well as several off campus.

Grades will be determined by the class presentation (15%), the composition component of the project (40%), and exams.  There will be two exams, a midterm (20%) and a final (20%). The remaining 5% of the grade will be determined by lab assignments, attendance and class participation. Further details about the class, including a detailed schedule and list of assignments can be found on my website at https://pcm.peabody.jhu.edu/~mboyle/intro.html.

 

 

 

GUIDELINES

Attendance is required for this fast paced course. More than three absences will result in a lowered grade.

 

 

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY

Students enrolled at Peabody are obliged to refrain from acts that threaten the academic integrity of the Conservatory such as cheating or plagiarism.  Violations are reported to Academic Affairs for adjudication and documentation in the student academic record.  Please familiarize yourself with this and all other academic regulations at:

http://www.peabody.jhu.edu/academicaffairs  

 

 

 

DIVERSITY & DISABILITY STATEMENT

The Peabody Institute of the Johns Hopkins University values diversity and inclusion.  We are committed to a climate of mutual respect and civility among members of our community.  Peabody recognizes that disability is an aspect of diversity.  Our goal is to create learning environments that are usable, equitable, inclusive and welcoming.  If there are aspects of the instruction or design of this course that result in barriers to your inclusion or to accurate assessment or achievement related to your disability, please notify the instructor as soon as possible.  Students are also welcome to contact Kyley Sommer, Director of Student Affairs in the Office of Student Affairs, in-person, via email at ksommer@jhu.edu, or by phone at (667) 208-6700  for further information about academic adjustments or accommodations.  

 

 

REQUIRED MATERIALS

There is no single textbook for the course. Readings will be assigned from a variety of sources, including manuals and periodicals. These will be placed on reserve in the music library, made available in the studio,  or handed out in class. On-line references will also be used, with links to them posted on the instructor's web page.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TENTATIVE SCHEDULE

 

 

WEEK

TOPIC/READING/ASSIGNMENT

01

01/16/17

Review

02

01/23/17

Electronic Music history part I

03

02/06/17

Electronic Music history part II

04

02/13/17

Electronic Music history part III

05

02/20/17

Audition Week

06

02/27/17

Computer Music history part I

07

03/06/17

Computer Music history part II

8

03/13/17

Student Presentations

09

03/20/17

Spring Break

10

03/27/17

Intermediate Max/MSP

11

04/03/17

Student progress reports

12

04/10/17

Advanced Max

13

04/17/17

Student progress reports

14

04/24/17

Final project completion

15

05/01/17

Concert Production